contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right.


Minneapolis, MN

Welcome to Flock of Broads. Here you will find the musings of five smart gals affectionately called "The Flock", all currently based in Minneapolis, MN. From pie crusts to parties, beard oil to Beyoncé, fashion to fat pants, we cover life as we know it and even a few things in between. Pull up a chair and stay a while.

All Posts

 

 

DIY: Paper Mache Saves The Day

Alexandra Heide

I've wanted to own a dress form for as long as I can remember. Why? I don't quite know, but when I came across one for $2 at a garage sale I knew I had to give it a home. I soon realized that it was too good to be true as pieces of foam slipped out the bottom en route to my car. It also had tears around the neck and--wait for it--a couple of stains. (Perhaps its original owner should have paid me for it?) Still, I couldn't shake the feeling that I could make something magical of it, so I brushed off the ol' elementary school paper mache skills and, voilà! I have a whole new statement piece.

BEFORE:  It photographed much better than it looked. Note the stains around the neck and the filling hanging out the bottom.

BEFORE:  It photographed much better than it looked. Note the stains around the neck and the filling hanging out the bottom.

SUPPLIES

Paper (Cut it into strips; I worked with City Pages and Vita.mn for color and "local flair" but black and white newspaper would look neat)

Water (Warm it up a bit)

Flour  

Salt 

Duct tape (For any holes that need sealing)

A bowl to mix in and a scissors (If you want clean paper edges)

I bet you already have at least 75% of these items right. now.

PROCESS

I started by duct taping around the bottom and neck area so the filling wouldn't fall out. Then, I made a simple paper mache mixture of flour, water and salt. Start small, but mix together 1 part flour to 2 parts water and whisk until the chunks are gone. (Note:  The salt is optional, but it's good to use if you have any fear of mold.) Cut or rip your paper into thin strips and dip into the mache mixture. Dipping the paper into the tacky mix gets messy, but after seeing the dried result of the layered pieces, I can say it was well worth the effort.

The best part? This dingy dress form do-over cost less than $15.

 Now I just need to figure out where to put it.

 Now I just need to figure out where to put it.